Archives for category: Music

In collaboration with Studium Generale of Leiden University and several others, I am organizing 6 meetings between Dutch artists and scholars to talk about the role, function, and position of both the arts and the sciences in our contemporary society.

April 14: Ramsey Nasr (poet/writer/actor/director) and Hans Clevers (geneticist/physician/Professor of Immunology)
April 28: Hans van Houwelingen (painter/visual artist) and Maarten Janssen (Professor of Archaeology)
May 12: Barbara Visser (photographer/visual artist) and Frans-Willem Korsten (Professor of Literature and Society)
May 26: Johan Simons (theater director) and Carel Stolker (lawyer and Rector of Leiden University)
June 9: Francine Houben (architect) and Marileen Dogterom (bionanoscientist)
June 23: Colin Benders aka Kyteman (musician) and Bas Haring (philosopher/writer)
Live music by Juan Parra and Henry Vega. Panel chairman Andrea van Pol. Location: Het Paard in The Hague. Official language: Dutch. More info at:

Jazz Utopia conference logo

The fourth Rhythm Changes conference: Jazz Utopia will take place at Birmingham City University in the United Kingdom from 14 to 17 April 2016.

Keynote Speakers
Professor Ingrid Monson (Harvard University)
Professor Raymond MacDonald (University of Edinburgh)

We invite paper submissions for Jazz Utopia, a four-day multi-disciplinary conference that brings together leading researchers across the arts and humanities. The event will feature academic papers, panels and poster sessions alongside an exciting programme of concerts delivered in partnership with the Birmingham Conservatoire and Jazzlines.

Jazz has long been a subject for utopian longing and hopes for a better future; it has also been the focus of deeply engrained cultural fears, visions of suffering and dystopian fantasies. In its urgency and presence jazz is now here. As improvisational and transitory, jazz is nowhere. Utopia is nowhere and now here. Jazz is utopia. Or: jazz is utopian desire. Jazz Utopia seeks to critically explore how the idea of utopia has shaped, and continues to shape, debates about jazz. We welcome papers that address the conference theme from multiple perspectives, including cultural studies, musicology, cultural theory, music analysis, jazz history, media studies, and practice-based research. Within the general theme of Jazz Utopia, we have identified three sub-themes. Please clearly identify which theme you are speaking to in your proposal.

•  Jazz Identities
Claims have always been made for jazz as a certain utopian practice, in which jazz has made possible a musical-social space where different, usually marginal, identities are expressed and confirmed. At the multiracial club, bandstand, or dance-floor race and ethnicity are acknowledged, difference is championed or erased. Musicians have used jazz to step out of their class. The dialogic qualities and queer sounds alike of jazz offer opportunity for the expression of gender and sexuality. New thinking around disability and music reads jazz as a crip-space. Equally, consider the way in which freedom in improvisation has been understood as a liberating utopian practice. Even in its diasporic invention jazz comes from a kind of no-place (ou-topia = no place). In utopia, jazz is the effort to sound another world into being, the only condition of which is that it must be better. Has jazz really been that good?

•  Inside / Outside: jazz and its others
What does jazz mean to its community of insiders and those that approach it from outside? For those who are deeply involved with jazz, whether musicians, critics, scholars, or fans, the genre often provides a utopian space for creative encounters. By definition, the articulation of this space through performance, writing, research and consumption also creates a community of outsiders who may seek ways to engage with the jazz community or observe it from afar. This strand invites papers that address the relationships between jazz and its ‘others’, defined in relation to music making, criticism, scholarship or reception, whether these interactions are antagonistic or collaborative in tone.

•  Heritage and archiving
This strand focuses on the different ways in which heritage practices and archival work contribute to the reconfiguration of jazz as a utopian space. Through its commitment to alternative ways of living and being, jazz offers imaginative variations on themes of history and preservation. It creates communities of collectors and music lovers, who refigure jazz as nostalgia and escape, as well as renewal and return. We welcome papers that explore all aspects of archiving practice and cultural heritage and the opportunities and tensions that present themselves for scholars, institutions and practitioners in these fields.

Proposals are invited for:
•  Individual papers (20 minutes) – up to 350 words.
•  Themed paper sessions of three individual (20 minute) papers – 350 words per paper plus 350 words outlining the rationale for the session.
•  Seventy-five minute sessions in innovative formats – up to 1000 words outlining the form and content of the sessions.

Please submit proposals (including a short biography and institutional affiliation) by email in a word document attachment to: jazzutopia@bcu.ac.uk

The deadline for proposals is 1st September 2015; outcomes will be communicated to authors by 1st October 2015. All paper submissions will be considered by the conference committee: Christa Bruckner-Haring, Nicholas Gebhardt, George McKay, Loes Rusch, Catherine Tackley, Walter van de Leur and Tony Whyton.

The conference builds on the legacy of the Rhythm Changes research project. Rhythm Changes: Jazz Cultures and European Identities was funded as part of the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) Joint Research Programme, which ran from 2010-2013. The project team continues to develop networking opportunities and champion collaborative research into transnational jazz studies.

Updates on the conference and information about travel and accommodation will be available at: http://www.rhythmchanges.net

Rhythm Changes

For more than 20 years, the Utrecht Early Music Festival (FOMU) has worked together with STIMU in organizing workshops, conferences and masterclasses relating to historically inspired performance pratice. This year’s STIMU Symposium is entitled The past is a foreign country, it takes place from 28 to 30 August 2015, and it thematizes the cultural position and attitudes of the researcher in the study and performance practice of early music. Curators are Jed Wentz and Barbara Titus.

The STIMU Symposium curators encourage young scholars and researching performers to use the STIMU Symposium as a forum for intellectual growth, networking and career development. Therefore, the Festival and STIMU have decided to continue to award the STIMU Young Scholars Award on a yearly basis. Apply for 2015 The STIMU Symposium invites proposals for

– Individual papers: 20 minutes, with 10 minutes for questions at the end.

– Lecture recitals: 30 minutes, with 10 minutes for questions at the end.

Young scholars currently enrolled in a master programme (either at conservatory or university level), or who have recently graduated from one, may apply to speak in the Festival Symposium using the following form. Young scholars whose work is accepted will receive travel expenses and accommodation in Utrecht during the course of the Symposium.

Topics could concern, but are not limited to:

– Interaction between music traditions within and outside Europe

– The musical articulation and perception of English identity

– The dissemination of European musics over the world (through colonial infrastructures)

– Early Music movements in the 20th and 21st centuries

– Historical research as a modern and postmodern endeavor

– The researcher’s encounter with sources from the past

– The human body as a musical archive

Applications should consist of a proposal of a maximum of 250 words and a short biographical sketch, and can be sent to j.wentz@oudemuziek.nl by 15 May 2015 at the latest.

orgelpark

Bending Baroque: Organs as Artistic, Musical, and Sonic Technologies

The Orgelpark, Amsterdam, June 4-6 2015

Amongst musical instruments, the pipe organ has the longest history of innovation. Since the ancient Greeks the design and function of the pipe organ has routinely changed, leading many to examine how these instruments both influence and are influenced by changing musical cultures. Added to this, organs are also technical artifacts and contain within them centuries of building practices and the tacit knowledge of organ builders. As such, organs can be interpreted as aesthetic and technological mirrors of their time.

The aim of this symposium is to situate organs as objects that are simultaneously musical and technical, producing music/sound as well as knowledge. As such, they combine artistic and epistemic practices in relation to performance, listening, and design. To better explore these topics, we invite contributions that draw upon Science & Technology Studies (including the Philosophy and History of Science), Sound Studies, and Artistic Research.

The context of this symposium is the building of a ‘New Baroque Organ’ at the Orgelpark, a privately funded concert venue in Amsterdam that aims to integrate the organ into contemporary musical cultures by presenting it in new ways. The New Baroque Organ will combine 18th and 21st century technologies. Its purpose is to facilitate historically informed performances of Johann Sebastian Bach’s organ music and to make the sound resources needed for that accessible in innovative ways that can inspire new music. As such, the New Baroque Organ represents a next step in the development of radically innovative organs that the American organist and organ scholar Randall Harlow has called ‘hyper organs’.

The process of designing this organ has opened up a number of questions that we wish to explore during this symposium, including:

  • How can insights and themes from studies of technological innovation be applied to the construction of the New Baroque Organ?
  • What connections are there between musical instruments and the creation of new knowledge about these instruments and musical culture? Can we consider musical instruments as we do scientific instruments that produce particular epistemic practices.
  • How are, and how can, historically informed practices of performance, composition, and listening taken into account in the design of the organ?
  • How can we think of the organ as an artistic technology?

We invite papers and art works that examine these questions and others like them.

Please, submit your abstract of no more than 300 words no later than 1 April 2015 to hansfidom@orgelpark.nl or p.peters@maastrichtuniversity.nl

glasgow

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 31 MARCH 2015

The Ninth Biennial International Conference on Music Since 1900 will take place at the University of Glasgow, School of Culture and Creative Arts, from Monday 7th September to Wednesday 9th September, 2015. We invite proposals for papers on any topic relating to 20th- and 21st-century music conceived in the broadest possible terms, including sound studies and inter-media arts. We welcome all methodological approaches, and particularly encourage submissions that question disciplinary boundaries and/or propose interdisciplinary perspectives.

Proposals in the following categories will be considered:

  • Papers: 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion. Please submit a 250-word (maximum) abstract.
  • Paper sessions: 3 or 4 papers, each of 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion. Please submit a 250-word (maximum) summary of the session, plus a 250-word (maximum) abstract for each session participant.
  • Lecture-recitals, including lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings. Please submit a 250-word (maximum) summary, plus participant CVs and recordings/scores/other details of works to be included in the event.

Proposals (as a Word attachment) can be sent to arts-icmsn@glasgow.ac.uk, indicating whether you need any AV equipment or a piano. Successful applicants will be informed by 1 May 2015.

Program committee: Dr Eva Moreda Rodriguez (University of Glasgow, Chair), Dr David Code (University of Glasgow), Dr Laura Hamer (Liverpool Hope University), Dr Philippa Lovatt (University of Stirling), Dr Christopher Mark (University of Surrey), Dr Mark Percival (Queen Margaret University)

whisper opera

The setting:  Four stages separated by semi-translucent lace curtains. Each stage contains one instrument besides a hanging big drum and a cymbal. The audience (max. 48) is divided in 8 x 6 people and seated in between the four stages so that each group of people can only see one stage.

The beginning: four musicians on the four different stages start playing the cymbals by, for example, turning them around and around; the sound is barely audible. After a while, they start whispering short textual fragments in a polyphonic style.

The middle: a beautiful musical conversation between flute and clarinet. It is almost impossible to distinguish which sound is coming from which instrument. They interact as a kind of echoing.

The end: the loudest part of the piece, though still really soft – an affecting aria (the first and only time the female vocalist really sings), accompanied by cello, clarinet, flute, and keyboard. The ending is quite abrupt.

David Lang’s Whispering Opera. Fantastic!

WP-Header-21
We’re delighted to announce that our 2015 Annual Conference will take place at King’s College London on 17-18 July 2015. The event will be co-hosted by the Departments of Music and Philosophy at King’s College London and the Institute of Musical Research, University of London. As part of our first ever tri-continental partnership, the event is being held in collaboration with the Music and Philosophy Study Group of the American Musicological Society and De Musica – Laboratório de Estética e Filosofia da Música (Brasil).
The optional theme for the event is “Music and the Senses.” The call for papers is now open!
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/call-for-papers/
The deadline for proposals is 7 March 2015. Outcomes will be communicated to all authors by 21 March 2015 in order to allow plentiful time to make travel arrangements for those coming from further afield who may only be able to attend the event if a paper is accepted.
Keynote speakers will include:
  • Professor Christopher Peacocke (Columbia University)
  • Professor Kay Kaufman Shelemay (Harvard University)
There will also be a plenary panel discussion on the theme of “Absolute Music,” featuring panelists:
  • Professor Mark Evan Bonds (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
  • Professor Simon Frith (University of Edinburgh)
  • Professor Hannah Ginsborg (University of California at Berkeley)
Further information on these speakers is available here:
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/keynote-plenary-speakers/ 
For more information on all aspects of the conference, please visit the conference website:
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/ 

Sussex

The School of Media, Film and Music (MFM) at the University of Sussex is pleased to invite applications to study for a PhD.

We offer expert supervision in the following areas:

As a member of CHASE, the AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership, MFM is able to offer a number of studentships to well-qualified candidates. CHASE is the Consortium for the Humanities and the Arts in Southeast England, a partnership of 7 institutions (Sussex, UEA, Kent, Goldsmiths, Essex, the Courtauld Institute and the Open University). £17m has been awarded to provide doctoral training and to promote excellence in research, including the funding of 75 scholarships this year.

Successful applicants to MFM will be eligible to compete for these studentships.  For UK students, these awards cover both fees and maintenance and for EU residents awards are on a fees only basis. MFM has an outstanding record in research, and  is currently home to over 90 research students who contribute actively to our lively interdisciplinary research culture. Our students have a good track record in attracting funding.

  • If you would like to visit the campus and talk to faculty, please come to our Postgraduate Open Evening on 3rd December: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/visitus/pg/phdevenings
  • or get in touch with the School’s Director of Doctoral Studies, Dr. Kate Lacey, who is happy to answer any questions about our doctoral programmes and the application process:k.lacey@sussex.ac.uk

The deadline for applications (including all supporting information such as references, etc.) is January 14th 2015. You are encouraged to contact the School as soon as possible to start the application process.

british airways

The airline is pairing its meals with specific tracks, as a study says this can enhance the flavors

British Airways is due to start matching its in-flight meals with specific music tracks in order to counteract the fact that a person’s ability to taste is reduced by 30% while in the air. These pairings are based on a study that suggests some tunes can influence your taste buds, and they aim to help bring out the flavor of the food.

The airline’s new “Sound Bite” menu will be available on the “Rock and Pop” audio channel on long-haul flights from November. This 13-track playlist features music that has been carefully selected to go with each item on the menu, with the intention of enhancing the in-flight meal experience.

A study conducted by Professor Charles Spence and his team at Oxford University in the UK suggests that certain music can influence a person’s taste buds. This has been labelled ‘Sonic Seasoning’, with specific tracks seemingly able to make food seem up to 10% more sweet or salty.

ba-in-flight-meal.jpg

British Airways’ chef Mark Tazzioli adds that the findings of this study to his list of considerations (which also included taste being altered at altitude) in order to create the new special edition menu. The “Sound Bite” playlist includes Scottish artist Paolo Nutini’s “Scream (Funk My Life Up)” to go with the Scottish salmon starter, Coldplay’s “A Sky Full of Stars” for a classic British main meal, Madonna’s “Ray of Light” for desserts, and “Nessun Dorma” by Placido Domingo to go with a cup of coffee.

The reasoning behind these tracks being selected were that Scottish musicians enhance the providence of Scottish foods, British music should be paired with British food, high tones boost the sweet flavors of puddings, and a tenor’s low tones suit the bitterness of coffee. Professor Spence comments:

In the coming months and years we are going to see far more interest in the matching of music and soundscape to what we eat and drink. I think that it is a really exciting and innovative development to see British Airways taking the first steps in this direction.

bogota

Composer Nic Collins just released his Pea Soup To Go, an open access version of his venerable feedback composition, Pea Soup. Pea Soup To Go is a free streaming audio web application that generates an ever-changing domestic sound art installation on any computer.

Premiered in 1974, Pea Soup creates a self-stabilizing feedback network of microphones and speakers that tunes itself to the architectural acoustics of the space and responds to events—instrumental performances, ambient sounds, human movement, even air currents—with swooping flights of sound. Pea Soup To Go mines decades of performances, including contributions by numerous guest musicians, from around the globe to produce a similarly dreamy soundscape that slowly shifts from key to key as the app shuffles and cross-fades from one recorded space to another.

Pea Soup To Go is being launched on October 24, 2014 — the 40th anniversary of the first performance of Pea Soup.

Point your browser to http://www.nicolascollins.com/peasouptogo/.  Auto-shuffle plays endless variations unattended, or click the arrows to jump to the next track.  Click “Info” for performance details.