Archives for category: Sound Art

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music and ethics

… more good news … after the launch of “my” MOOC Music & Society a couple of days ago, today I found on my doormat the paperback version of “Music and Ethics”, the book I wrote with Nanette Nielsen. 35 GBP instead of the 95 GBP for the hard cover. IOW, affordable for more people!

My inaugural lecture, “Towards a ‘New’ Sonic Ecology” is now available online.

Please go on this site to “publications” and then to “articles”.

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On Monday 28 November, I will give my inaugural lecture at Leiden University. You are welcome to attend. It starts at 4 pm. Find the official invitation here oratie-cobussen-uitnodiging

The title of the lecture is “Towards a ‘new’ sonic ecology,” an appeal in favor of a more prominent role for sound artists in the design of public urban spaces. Although the invitation is in Dutch, the lecture will be in English. With the cooperation of two musical guests!

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Conference dates: 29-30 November 2016

Location: Leiden University, the Netherlands

 

Introduction to the Conference Topic

Sound is among the most significant, yet least-discussed, aspects of public spaces in urban environments (Hosokawa 1984; Kang and Schulte-Fortkamp 2016). Architects, engineers, and urban planners invariably stress the visual and tactile aspects while (re)designing urban environments but often pay less attention to the aural consequences of their interventions; sound tends to be considered mainly as an inevitable byproduct of industrial areas, traffic, commercial centers, and/or human activities. If sound attracts the attention of policy makers and users of public urban spaces, it is often in a rather negative context: as noise pollution which should be avoided by somehow reducing the amount of decibels (Devilee, Maris, van der Kamp 2010; Elmqvist 2013; Kamin 2015).

 

In contrast, this conference aims to increase the attention to the role of sound, sound design, and sounding art in urban spaces – with sound considered both as an epistemological tool and as an aesthetic instrument.

Sounds in urban spaces – including the “omnipresence” of music – (co-)regulate our behavior, attract specific groups that give a space a specific identity, call for certain actions, make us nauseated, etc.; sounds thus have social, political, ethical, and economic power. Reflections on everyday urban soundscapes – their features as well as the way they are used and experienced – could lead to a new theory of sonic ecology.

Furthermore, sounding art has the potential to contribute directly to an improvement of city soundscapes, while a more fundamental and scholarly attention to sounds in public urban spaces can lead to a concrete contribution to already existing discourses in urban studies, history, anthropology, and philosophy.

 

In this conference three questions will play a central role:

  1. How do sounds in general and sounding art in particular contribute to the general atmosphere of a public urban space?
  2. How do users of that space – dwellers, tourists, people working in that neighborhood, passersby – experience its sonic qualities and how does that influence their behavior as well as the function of that space?
  3. How can we, on a theoretical level, develop a new sonic ecology?

 

Keynote speakers: Salomé Voegelin, Gascia Ouzounian, Holger Schulze, and Jean-Paul Thibaud.

 

Conference Coordinator: Prof. dr. M.A. (Marcel) Cobussen

(M.A.Cobussen@umail.leidenuniv.nl)

 

Abstracts: Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Gabriel Paiuk acpa@hum.leidenuniv.nl before October 1, 2016. Submitters will be informed before October 15.

 

The conference is sponsored by KNAW, LUF, JSS, and ACPA (Leiden University)

logo knawlogo leiden universitylogo lufsonicstudies-banner

 

 

 

sounding art companion

I just received an email from Routledge that that The Routledge Companion to Sounding Art has now officially published! The book presents an overview of the issues, methods, and approaches crucial for the study of sound in artistic practice. Thirty-six essays cover a variety of interdisciplinary approaches to studying sounding art from the fields of musicology, cultural studies, sound design, auditory culture, art history, and philosophy. The companion website hosts sound examples and links to further resources.

The collection is organized around six main themes:

  • Sounding Art: The notion of sounding art, its relation to sound studies, and its evolution and possibilities.
  • Acoustic Knowledge and Communication: How we approach, study, and analyze sound and the challenges of writing about sound.
  • Listening and Memory: Listening from different perspectives, from the psychology of listening to embodied and technologically mediated listening.
  • Acoustic Spaces, Identities and Communities: How humans arrange their sonic environments, how this relates to sonic identity, how music contributes to our environment, and the ethical and political implications of sound.
  • Sonic Histories: How studying sounding art can contribute methodologically and epistemologically to historiography.
  • Sound Technologies and Media: The impact of sonic technologies on contemporary culture, electroacoustic innovation, and how the way we make and access music has changed.

With contributions from leading scholars and cutting-edge researchers, The Routledge Companion to Sounding Art is an essential resource for anyone studying the intersection of sound and art.


I’m working hard on my contribution to The Oxford Handbook of Sound & Imagination. The editors want to put less emphasis on the visual connotation of the word “imagination” and are primarily interested in what they call “sonic imagination”. I’ve decided that my article will concentrate on the role of imagination while listening to sounding art (by which I mean both music and sound art, actually all art in which sound plays a substantial role). The question that keeps me busy at this moment is if it is possible that we do NOT use our imagination while listening to music. Any thoughts from your side?

Soon the Routledge Companion to Sounding Art, edited by Barry Truax, Vincent Meelberg and myself will be available. The Companion presents an overview of the issues, methods, and approaches crucial for the study of sound in artistic practice. Thirty-six essays cover a variety of interdisciplinary approaches to studying sounding art from the fields of musicology, cultural studies, sound design, auditory culture, art history, and philosophy. The companion website hosts sound examples, links to further resources, and a blog for further discussion.

The collection is organized around six main themes:
– Sounding Art: The notion of sounding art, its relation to sound studies, and its evolution and possibilities.
– Acoustic Knowledge and Communication: How we approach, study, and analyze sound and the challenges of writing about sound.
– Listening and Memory: Listening from different perspectives, from the psychology of listening to embodied and technologically mediated listening.
– Acoustic Spaces, Identities and Communities: How humans arrange their sonic environments, how this relates to sonic identity, how music contributes to our environment, and the ethical and political implications of sound.
– Sonic Histories: How studying sounding art can contribute methodologically and epistemologically to historiography- Sound Technologies and Media: The impact of sonic technologies on contemporary culture, electroacoustic innovation, and how the way we make and access music has changed.

With contributions from leading scholars and cutting-edge researchers, The Routledge Companion to Sounding Art is an essential resource for anyone studying the intersection of sound and art.

DARE 2015
9 – 11 November 2015
Orpheus Institute | Ghent | Belgium

DARE 2015, The Dark Precursor, is the first international conference entirely dedicated to the relation between artistic research and French philosopher Gilles Deleuze and/or Félix Guattari. The three-day will feature both artistic presentations and scholarly papers that investigate this relation.
The Deleuze/Guattari’s philosophy acts as a key reference for many artist-researchers, who engage with knowledge across academic and non-academic fields of practice. The extent and depth of their influence on artistic research is largely uncharted, nor has their philosophy ever before been evaluated from the perspective of artists.

orgelpark

Bending Baroque: Organs as Artistic, Musical, and Sonic Technologies

The Orgelpark, Amsterdam, June 4-6 2015

Amongst musical instruments, the pipe organ has the longest history of innovation. Since the ancient Greeks the design and function of the pipe organ has routinely changed, leading many to examine how these instruments both influence and are influenced by changing musical cultures. Added to this, organs are also technical artifacts and contain within them centuries of building practices and the tacit knowledge of organ builders. As such, organs can be interpreted as aesthetic and technological mirrors of their time.

The aim of this symposium is to situate organs as objects that are simultaneously musical and technical, producing music/sound as well as knowledge. As such, they combine artistic and epistemic practices in relation to performance, listening, and design. To better explore these topics, we invite contributions that draw upon Science & Technology Studies (including the Philosophy and History of Science), Sound Studies, and Artistic Research.

The context of this symposium is the building of a ‘New Baroque Organ’ at the Orgelpark, a privately funded concert venue in Amsterdam that aims to integrate the organ into contemporary musical cultures by presenting it in new ways. The New Baroque Organ will combine 18th and 21st century technologies. Its purpose is to facilitate historically informed performances of Johann Sebastian Bach’s organ music and to make the sound resources needed for that accessible in innovative ways that can inspire new music. As such, the New Baroque Organ represents a next step in the development of radically innovative organs that the American organist and organ scholar Randall Harlow has called ‘hyper organs’.

The process of designing this organ has opened up a number of questions that we wish to explore during this symposium, including:

  • How can insights and themes from studies of technological innovation be applied to the construction of the New Baroque Organ?
  • What connections are there between musical instruments and the creation of new knowledge about these instruments and musical culture? Can we consider musical instruments as we do scientific instruments that produce particular epistemic practices.
  • How are, and how can, historically informed practices of performance, composition, and listening taken into account in the design of the organ?
  • How can we think of the organ as an artistic technology?

We invite papers and art works that examine these questions and others like them.

Please, submit your abstract of no more than 300 words no later than 1 April 2015 to hansfidom@orgelpark.nl or p.peters@maastrichtuniversity.nl