Archives for category: Philosophy

 

Conference dates: 29-30 November 2016

Location: Leiden University, the Netherlands

 

Introduction to the Conference Topic

Sound is among the most significant, yet least-discussed, aspects of public spaces in urban environments (Hosokawa 1984; Kang and Schulte-Fortkamp 2016). Architects, engineers, and urban planners invariably stress the visual and tactile aspects while (re)designing urban environments but often pay less attention to the aural consequences of their interventions; sound tends to be considered mainly as an inevitable byproduct of industrial areas, traffic, commercial centers, and/or human activities. If sound attracts the attention of policy makers and users of public urban spaces, it is often in a rather negative context: as noise pollution which should be avoided by somehow reducing the amount of decibels (Devilee, Maris, van der Kamp 2010; Elmqvist 2013; Kamin 2015).

 

In contrast, this conference aims to increase the attention to the role of sound, sound design, and sounding art in urban spaces – with sound considered both as an epistemological tool and as an aesthetic instrument.

Sounds in urban spaces – including the “omnipresence” of music – (co-)regulate our behavior, attract specific groups that give a space a specific identity, call for certain actions, make us nauseated, etc.; sounds thus have social, political, ethical, and economic power. Reflections on everyday urban soundscapes – their features as well as the way they are used and experienced – could lead to a new theory of sonic ecology.

Furthermore, sounding art has the potential to contribute directly to an improvement of city soundscapes, while a more fundamental and scholarly attention to sounds in public urban spaces can lead to a concrete contribution to already existing discourses in urban studies, history, anthropology, and philosophy.

 

In this conference three questions will play a central role:

  1. How do sounds in general and sounding art in particular contribute to the general atmosphere of a public urban space?
  2. How do users of that space – dwellers, tourists, people working in that neighborhood, passersby – experience its sonic qualities and how does that influence their behavior as well as the function of that space?
  3. How can we, on a theoretical level, develop a new sonic ecology?

 

Keynote speakers: Salomé Voegelin, Gascia Ouzounian, Holger Schulze, and Jean-Paul Thibaud.

 

Conference Coordinator: Prof. dr. M.A. (Marcel) Cobussen

(M.A.Cobussen@umail.leidenuniv.nl)

 

Abstracts: Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Gabriel Paiuk acpa@hum.leidenuniv.nl before October 1, 2016. Submitters will be informed before October 15.

 

The conference is sponsored by KNAW, LUF, JSS, and ACPA (Leiden University)

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sounding art companion

I just received an email from Routledge that that The Routledge Companion to Sounding Art has now officially published! The book presents an overview of the issues, methods, and approaches crucial for the study of sound in artistic practice. Thirty-six essays cover a variety of interdisciplinary approaches to studying sounding art from the fields of musicology, cultural studies, sound design, auditory culture, art history, and philosophy. The companion website hosts sound examples and links to further resources.

The collection is organized around six main themes:

  • Sounding Art: The notion of sounding art, its relation to sound studies, and its evolution and possibilities.
  • Acoustic Knowledge and Communication: How we approach, study, and analyze sound and the challenges of writing about sound.
  • Listening and Memory: Listening from different perspectives, from the psychology of listening to embodied and technologically mediated listening.
  • Acoustic Spaces, Identities and Communities: How humans arrange their sonic environments, how this relates to sonic identity, how music contributes to our environment, and the ethical and political implications of sound.
  • Sonic Histories: How studying sounding art can contribute methodologically and epistemologically to historiography.
  • Sound Technologies and Media: The impact of sonic technologies on contemporary culture, electroacoustic innovation, and how the way we make and access music has changed.

With contributions from leading scholars and cutting-edge researchers, The Routledge Companion to Sounding Art is an essential resource for anyone studying the intersection of sound and art.

Soon the Routledge Companion to Sounding Art, edited by Barry Truax, Vincent Meelberg and myself will be available. The Companion presents an overview of the issues, methods, and approaches crucial for the study of sound in artistic practice. Thirty-six essays cover a variety of interdisciplinary approaches to studying sounding art from the fields of musicology, cultural studies, sound design, auditory culture, art history, and philosophy. The companion website hosts sound examples, links to further resources, and a blog for further discussion.

The collection is organized around six main themes:
– Sounding Art: The notion of sounding art, its relation to sound studies, and its evolution and possibilities.
– Acoustic Knowledge and Communication: How we approach, study, and analyze sound and the challenges of writing about sound.
– Listening and Memory: Listening from different perspectives, from the psychology of listening to embodied and technologically mediated listening.
– Acoustic Spaces, Identities and Communities: How humans arrange their sonic environments, how this relates to sonic identity, how music contributes to our environment, and the ethical and political implications of sound.
– Sonic Histories: How studying sounding art can contribute methodologically and epistemologically to historiography- Sound Technologies and Media: The impact of sonic technologies on contemporary culture, electroacoustic innovation, and how the way we make and access music has changed.

With contributions from leading scholars and cutting-edge researchers, The Routledge Companion to Sounding Art is an essential resource for anyone studying the intersection of sound and art.

loudspeakers

Working hard on a Massive Open Online Course right now. Topic: Music & Society. Four modules: (a) Music and Atmospheres; (b) Music and Identity; (c) Music and Politics; (d) Music, Norms and Values. The course will contain attractive video’s, challenging texts, interviews with famous scholars and musicians, etc. Should be online in September 2016.

DARE 2015
9 – 11 November 2015
Orpheus Institute | Ghent | Belgium

DARE 2015, The Dark Precursor, is the first international conference entirely dedicated to the relation between artistic research and French philosopher Gilles Deleuze and/or Félix Guattari. The three-day will feature both artistic presentations and scholarly papers that investigate this relation.
The Deleuze/Guattari’s philosophy acts as a key reference for many artist-researchers, who engage with knowledge across academic and non-academic fields of practice. The extent and depth of their influence on artistic research is largely uncharted, nor has their philosophy ever before been evaluated from the perspective of artists.

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From June 11 till 13 Performa ’15 will take place at the University of Aveiro in Portugal. On June 11 I will open the conference with a keynote lecture entitled “Musical Performances are (not) Artistic Research”. Of course I will pay attention to my favorite topic, the relation between artistic research and knowledge; however, the major part of my presentation will consist of particular musical performances and their relation (or not) to artistic research.

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor sublime in music image

30-31st October 2015: The University of Aberdeen and the SOUND festival, Aberdeen, Scotland.

Theodor Adorno noted the difficulty of creating new art that can be beautiful in a truthful way, eschewing any response to musical modernity that would allow its easy assimilation in terms of the traditionally beautiful. For Jean-François Lyotard, the arts for the last century have no longer been concerned primarily with the beautiful but rather with a renewed concept of the sublime. This dissociation of the beautiful from the modern in Adorno and Lyotard contrasts strikingly with Helmut Lachenmann’s revalorisation of the beautiful and his distinction of ‘humanity’s legitimate and profoundly rooted demand for art as the experience of Beauty, and its false satisfaction and alienation in the form of art “fodder” manufactured by the bourgeoisie and preserved in a society of repressed contradictions’ (Lachenmann 1980, 20). Out of this polarity of the modern as the moment of the sublime (Lyotard) and the possibility of a ‘rescued’ concept of the beautiful (Lachenmann), participants are invited to offer twenty minute papers on any aspect of musical modernity in relation to the beautiful and/or the sublime. The sublime has become a rich source of reflection in critical theory, with alternative conceptualisations from Lyotard, Derrida, Lacan, Zizek, Marion and others, and following Simon Morley’s categorisation, the contemporary sublime has been related to the unpresentable, transcendence, nature, technology, terror, the uncanny and altered states. While the sublime has not enjoyed attention in music studies comparable with what it has stimulated elsewhere in the humanities, this conference will provide a forum for musicological, theoretical and philosophical reflection in conjunction with a series of musical performances.

Proposals considering any of the following are welcomed:
• Musicological papers considering any aspect of contemporary music in relation to the sublime and/or the beautiful.
• Philosophical/Critical theory papers developing thinking on the beautiful and/or the sublime in relation to music.
• Papers considering musical modernity, politics and the sublime.
• Papers considering the extent to which music concerns the sublime or a reconstituted notion of beauty.

Abstracts should be c. 400 words and should also contain first and last name of presenter, title of proposed presentation, institutional affiliation, mailing address, telephone number and email address.
Proposals must be received no later than 20th April 2015 and should be posted toe.campbell@abdn.ac.uk.

Confirmed performers include: Ensemble Alternance (Paris, France) and Ian Pace (piano)

In collaboration with Studium Generale of Leiden University and several others, I am organizing 6 meetings between Dutch artists and scholars to talk about the role, function, and position of both the arts and the sciences in our contemporary society.

April 14: Ramsey Nasr (poet/writer/actor/director) and Hans Clevers (geneticist/physician/Professor of Immunology)
April 28: Hans van Houwelingen (painter/visual artist) and Maarten Janssen (Professor of Archaeology)
May 12: Barbara Visser (photographer/visual artist) and Frans-Willem Korsten (Professor of Literature and Society)
May 26: Johan Simons (theater director) and Carel Stolker (lawyer and Rector of Leiden University)
June 9: Francine Houben (architect) and Marileen Dogterom (bionanoscientist)
June 23: Colin Benders aka Kyteman (musician) and Bas Haring (philosopher/writer)
Live music by Juan Parra and Henry Vega. Panel chairman Andrea van Pol. Location: Het Paard in The Hague. Official language: Dutch. More info at:
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We’re delighted to announce that our 2015 Annual Conference will take place at King’s College London on 17-18 July 2015. The event will be co-hosted by the Departments of Music and Philosophy at King’s College London and the Institute of Musical Research, University of London. As part of our first ever tri-continental partnership, the event is being held in collaboration with the Music and Philosophy Study Group of the American Musicological Society and De Musica – Laboratório de Estética e Filosofia da Música (Brasil).
The optional theme for the event is “Music and the Senses.” The call for papers is now open!
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/call-for-papers/
The deadline for proposals is 7 March 2015. Outcomes will be communicated to all authors by 21 March 2015 in order to allow plentiful time to make travel arrangements for those coming from further afield who may only be able to attend the event if a paper is accepted.
Keynote speakers will include:
  • Professor Christopher Peacocke (Columbia University)
  • Professor Kay Kaufman Shelemay (Harvard University)
There will also be a plenary panel discussion on the theme of “Absolute Music,” featuring panelists:
  • Professor Mark Evan Bonds (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
  • Professor Simon Frith (University of Edinburgh)
  • Professor Hannah Ginsborg (University of California at Berkeley)
Further information on these speakers is available here:
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/keynote-plenary-speakers/ 
For more information on all aspects of the conference, please visit the conference website:
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/ 

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The 4th Annual Conference of the Royal Musical Association Music and Philosophy Study Group (in collaboration with the Music and Philosophy Study Group of the American Musicological Society) will be co-hosted by the Departments of Music and Philosophy at King’s College London, 27-28 June 2014.

The call for papers is now open and available here. The deadline for submissions is Friday, 7 February 2014.

Keynote speakers will include: