Archives for category: Conference

orgelpark

Bending Baroque: Organs as Artistic, Musical, and Sonic Technologies

The Orgelpark, Amsterdam, June 4-6 2015

Amongst musical instruments, the pipe organ has the longest history of innovation. Since the ancient Greeks the design and function of the pipe organ has routinely changed, leading many to examine how these instruments both influence and are influenced by changing musical cultures. Added to this, organs are also technical artifacts and contain within them centuries of building practices and the tacit knowledge of organ builders. As such, organs can be interpreted as aesthetic and technological mirrors of their time.

The aim of this symposium is to situate organs as objects that are simultaneously musical and technical, producing music/sound as well as knowledge. As such, they combine artistic and epistemic practices in relation to performance, listening, and design. To better explore these topics, we invite contributions that draw upon Science & Technology Studies (including the Philosophy and History of Science), Sound Studies, and Artistic Research.

The context of this symposium is the building of a ‘New Baroque Organ’ at the Orgelpark, a privately funded concert venue in Amsterdam that aims to integrate the organ into contemporary musical cultures by presenting it in new ways. The New Baroque Organ will combine 18th and 21st century technologies. Its purpose is to facilitate historically informed performances of Johann Sebastian Bach’s organ music and to make the sound resources needed for that accessible in innovative ways that can inspire new music. As such, the New Baroque Organ represents a next step in the development of radically innovative organs that the American organist and organ scholar Randall Harlow has called ‘hyper organs’.

The process of designing this organ has opened up a number of questions that we wish to explore during this symposium, including:

  • How can insights and themes from studies of technological innovation be applied to the construction of the New Baroque Organ?
  • What connections are there between musical instruments and the creation of new knowledge about these instruments and musical culture? Can we consider musical instruments as we do scientific instruments that produce particular epistemic practices.
  • How are, and how can, historically informed practices of performance, composition, and listening taken into account in the design of the organ?
  • How can we think of the organ as an artistic technology?

We invite papers and art works that examine these questions and others like them.

Please, submit your abstract of no more than 300 words no later than 1 April 2015 to hansfidom@orgelpark.nl or p.peters@maastrichtuniversity.nl

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glasgow

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 31 MARCH 2015

The Ninth Biennial International Conference on Music Since 1900 will take place at the University of Glasgow, School of Culture and Creative Arts, from Monday 7th September to Wednesday 9th September, 2015. We invite proposals for papers on any topic relating to 20th- and 21st-century music conceived in the broadest possible terms, including sound studies and inter-media arts. We welcome all methodological approaches, and particularly encourage submissions that question disciplinary boundaries and/or propose interdisciplinary perspectives.

Proposals in the following categories will be considered:

  • Papers: 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion. Please submit a 250-word (maximum) abstract.
  • Paper sessions: 3 or 4 papers, each of 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion. Please submit a 250-word (maximum) summary of the session, plus a 250-word (maximum) abstract for each session participant.
  • Lecture-recitals, including lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings. Please submit a 250-word (maximum) summary, plus participant CVs and recordings/scores/other details of works to be included in the event.

Proposals (as a Word attachment) can be sent to arts-icmsn@glasgow.ac.uk, indicating whether you need any AV equipment or a piano. Successful applicants will be informed by 1 May 2015.

Program committee: Dr Eva Moreda Rodriguez (University of Glasgow, Chair), Dr David Code (University of Glasgow), Dr Laura Hamer (Liverpool Hope University), Dr Philippa Lovatt (University of Stirling), Dr Christopher Mark (University of Surrey), Dr Mark Percival (Queen Margaret University)

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We’re delighted to announce that our 2015 Annual Conference will take place at King’s College London on 17-18 July 2015. The event will be co-hosted by the Departments of Music and Philosophy at King’s College London and the Institute of Musical Research, University of London. As part of our first ever tri-continental partnership, the event is being held in collaboration with the Music and Philosophy Study Group of the American Musicological Society and De Musica – Laboratório de Estética e Filosofia da Música (Brasil).
The optional theme for the event is “Music and the Senses.” The call for papers is now open!
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/call-for-papers/
The deadline for proposals is 7 March 2015. Outcomes will be communicated to all authors by 21 March 2015 in order to allow plentiful time to make travel arrangements for those coming from further afield who may only be able to attend the event if a paper is accepted.
Keynote speakers will include:
  • Professor Christopher Peacocke (Columbia University)
  • Professor Kay Kaufman Shelemay (Harvard University)
There will also be a plenary panel discussion on the theme of “Absolute Music,” featuring panelists:
  • Professor Mark Evan Bonds (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
  • Professor Simon Frith (University of Edinburgh)
  • Professor Hannah Ginsborg (University of California at Berkeley)
Further information on these speakers is available here:
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/keynote-plenary-speakers/ 
For more information on all aspects of the conference, please visit the conference website:
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/ 

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The Fifth Biennial International Conference on Mathematics and Computation in Music(MCM2015) will be held on 22-25 June-2015  at Queen Mary University of London in the United Kingdom. MCM is the flagship conference of the Society for Mathematics and Computation in Music, whose official publication is the Journal of Mathematics and Music.

The aim of the conference is to bring together researchers from around the world who adopt mathematical and/or computational approaches to address any aspect of music theory, music analysis, composition and performance. MCM aims to provide a dedicated platform for the communication and exchange of ideas amongst researchers in mathematics, informatics, music theory, composition, musicology, and related disciplines.

We welcome submissions on any topic relating to mathematics and/or computation and music, including (but not limited to):

  • Mathematical and computational models of and/or approaches to
    • musicology, music theory and analysis, composition
    • musical performance and improvisation
    • the perception and cognition of any aspect of musical structure
    • music and emotion
    • musical learning and education
    • musical interaction and gestures
  • Logical, philosophical and methodological aspects of mathematics and computation in music
  • The history of mathematics and computation in music
  • Applications of mathematical music theory and computational tools for musicians, musicologists and others who work with music

We invite submissions of the following types:

  • Long papers (10-12 pages in the Springer LNCS style) to be presented orally
  • Short papers (4-6 pages in the Springer LNCS style) to be presented as posters
  • Panel discussions
  • Workshops and tutorials

Accepted papers will be published by Springer in an edited volume in the series Lecture Notes in Computer Science, as were the proceedings of previous MCM conferences. For further details on the submissions guidelines for each of these types please checkout the “Submission” site.

The deadline for all types of submission is : Friday 9 January 2015.

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Topic

Up to this moment, there is no satisfying business model for Open Access journals within the Humanities. Yet, there is no turning back especially now the call for Open Access is strongly supported by politicians and funders.
Is it possible to keep existing journals afloat in an Open Access world? Or do we need to make more radical choices by reforming publication culture and journal formats in the Humanities?

This symposium, organised by TS·> Tijdschrift voor tijdschrift­studies and Utrecht University Library, will explore possible solutions for scholarly journals that are contemplating or planning a transition to Open Access, and for journals that are currently trying to survive in Open Access. Experts from the international field of Open Access publishing for Humanities will share their views and experiences.
Furthermore, several journal editors who made the transition to OA will talk about their new business models and the challenges they are facing.

Confirmed speakers and programme

  • Anne Bindslev, PhD (Co-Action Publishing, Senior Publisher)
  • Jan Erik Frantsvåg, MA (University of Tromsø, Open Access Adviser
  • Inge Werner, PhD (Utrecht University Library, Publishing Consultant)
  • Leonie de Goei & Aad Blok (PhD, Royal Netherlands Historical Society, PublisherBMGN – Low Countries Historical Review, & Managing Editor BMGN – Low Countries Historical Review, resp.)
  • Marcel Cobussen, PhD (Leiden University, Founding Editor Journal of Sonic Studies)
  • Esther Op de Beek, PhD (Leiden University, TreasurerTS·> Tijdschrift voor Tijdschriftstudies)

Date and location

  • 17th of October 2014
  • Utrecht University Library, Heidelberglaan 3, 3584 CS Utrecht,
    The Netherlands

Registration

vs. Interpretation. Bit of a strange title for a really interesting conference on improvisation I’m currently attending in Prague. Very nice mixture of paper presentations, workshops, and concerts. Today (July 17) great lecture-performance by violinist Mary Oliver, actually a homage to Misha Mengelberg. Also a great concert by George Lewis (electronics, trombone), Pauline Oliveros (accordeon) and Joelle Leandre (double bass). At a certain moment the concert connected to a text I recently wrote for my forthcoming book on improv, complexity, and singularity. The text is about the relation between improv and play and one of the characteristics of play is, at least according to Johan Huizinga in his Home Ludens that it is disconnected from “real” life. However, in this venue where the temperature reached some 35 degrees celcius, Joelle suddenly added her voice to the music, singing the words “It is hot”. In that very moment she broke the disconnection between play and real life – IOW, real life entered the improvisation, if only through text.
Tomorrow a keynote by Pauline and performances by Jef Goldberg, Phil Niblock, and Iva Bittova (among others).

International Association for the Study of Popular Music, Tilburg University and Erasmus University:
“A long way to the top: The production and reception of music in a globalized world”
6-7 November 2014 – Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands
Deadline: 1 June, 2014
Keynotes: John Street and Fabian Holt

AIM

Once upon a time, a famous rock ‘n’ roll group sang about what it means to play in a music band. In their lyrics they touch upon the role of the music industry (‘getting sold’), the difficulties of a musical career (‘under-paid’ and ‘getting grey’) and music consumption (‘if you wanna be a star’), while celebrating music for music’s sake. As such, this song addresses many issues in the production and reception of popular music in the contemporary globalized world. Yet, recent developments in the field of music have changed the ‘way to the top’, such as governmental policy on music, the rise of new media, and the growing number of music festivals. Focusing on a select number of interrelated themes, this conference aims to bring together scholars from various countries each with their own perspective to engage in an international exchange of ideas and current research insights about music production and reception.

THEMES

Regarding the production of music, we aim for papers on – but not strictly limited to – these themes:

  • Music industries and scenes: for example, what challenges are music industries facing in the 21st century? How have their business models changed over the last decade? To what extent is music increasingly produced within translocal and virtual scenes outside of traditional music industries?
  • Careers in pop music: for example, to what extent have artist labor markets changed over the last decades? Have music careers become longer and more flexible? What factors determine success?
  • Pop music policy: for example, to what extent and why do government organizations (national and local) fund what types of music? How are pop musicians promoted abroad and for what reasons? What role does music play in urban development and city branding?
  • New media and pop music: for example, how have streaming services changed music industries? Did social media affect the marketing of pop music? How do (online) consumer critics affect sales?

Regarding the reception of music, we aim for papers on – but not strictly limited to – these themes:

  • Pop music consumption and identity construction: for example, how important is pop music in processes of bounding and bridging social groups and group identities? How do music fans use the Internet in processes of meaning-making and sacralization?
  • Music performance, festivals and rituals: for example, how can music performances achieve intended transformative effects? How are they clustered in a particular period of time at a particular place? How can we explain the growing popularity of music festivals among international audiences?
  • Pop music, political activism and social movements: for example, what role does pop music play in social change? How politically engaged are pop musicians and what topics do they address?
  • Popular music heritage and tourism: for example, how and which pop music is being canonized? How does this relate to generational conflict, feelings of nostalgia and authenticity? INSTRUCTIONS

Please send your abstract of 400 words in English (including a research question, theory and methodology) together with a short biography (100 words), including name, institutional affiliation and position, phone number, postal and e-mail addresses, to: iaspmconference@eshcc.eur.nl
Abstract deadline: 1 June, 2014. Participants will receive notifications of acceptance by 1 August, 2014.

 

 

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“Sound Studies: Mapping the Field” will be the title of the second international ESSA conference. It will take place at the University of Copenhagen, June 27-29, 2014. Among the themes are: Case studies that testify to the recent changes within sound studies, theoretical reflections on sound studies’ futures, methodological papers testing the inter- or trans-disciplinary approaches of sound studies, historical papers that may help understand and contextualize the current developments, papers addressing how the sound industries take part in the recent developments, sound design futures, and presentations of contemporary artworks that incorporate sounds.

Proposals for panels: February 1

Individual papers: March 15

Keynote speakers are Georgina Born (Oxford University, UK), Norie Neumark (La Trobe University, Australia), Carolyn Birdsall (Amsterdam University, Holland)

Download the call for papers.

NEWNEWNEW: Call for panel papers

Panel no. 1: Methodologies of Sound Studies

M.Cobussen & H.Schulze

Sounding and hearing are not simple entities to be researched on. The specific corporeal as well as situative character and the historically and culturally relative nature of the sonic demand further developments of existing methods: how can we manage to integrate this rich corpus of everyday and in situ sounds into research? How can we avoid simply objectifying and reifying such processual and situative entities? What heuristics and methods are already in use and prove to result in insightful and inspiring research publications? Are there forgotten or overseen references in the history of epistemologies which we could take up and elaborate for sound studies? Are there research institutes or environments which are maybe overseen by current research and need to be reviewed? How can sound practices – be it in traditional sonification techniques or in daring and advanced forms of sounding art – themselves be used as experiential sites through which (sonic) events are investigated? This panel explores the diversity of approaches, methods and heuristics applicable to research into as well as through sound.

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The Improvising Across Borders Conference will take place on July 17-19, 2014, throughout downtown Prague.

Keynote speakers: George Lewis, Pauline Oliveros, and Dana Reason.

I will present a paper on the role of technology in the field of musical improvisation. Central question is if humans are indispensable for improvisation. I will argue that, although human input might always be present in any improvisation, it can be a minor actant in certain occasions; sometimes, technology is the most important (f)actor in an improv event.

You can find more information on the conference  (though not really a lot) on http://agosto-foundation.org/iab/

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The 4th Annual Conference of the Royal Musical Association Music and Philosophy Study Group (in collaboration with the Music and Philosophy Study Group of the American Musicological Society) will be co-hosted by the Departments of Music and Philosophy at King’s College London, 27-28 June 2014.

The call for papers is now open and available here. The deadline for submissions is Friday, 7 February 2014.

Keynote speakers will include: