Archives for category: Science

Soon the Routledge Companion to Sounding Art, edited by Barry Truax, Vincent Meelberg and myself will be available. The Companion presents an overview of the issues, methods, and approaches crucial for the study of sound in artistic practice. Thirty-six essays cover a variety of interdisciplinary approaches to studying sounding art from the fields of musicology, cultural studies, sound design, auditory culture, art history, and philosophy. The companion website hosts sound examples, links to further resources, and a blog for further discussion.

The collection is organized around six main themes:
– Sounding Art: The notion of sounding art, its relation to sound studies, and its evolution and possibilities.
– Acoustic Knowledge and Communication: How we approach, study, and analyze sound and the challenges of writing about sound.
– Listening and Memory: Listening from different perspectives, from the psychology of listening to embodied and technologically mediated listening.
– Acoustic Spaces, Identities and Communities: How humans arrange their sonic environments, how this relates to sonic identity, how music contributes to our environment, and the ethical and political implications of sound.
– Sonic Histories: How studying sounding art can contribute methodologically and epistemologically to historiography- Sound Technologies and Media: The impact of sonic technologies on contemporary culture, electroacoustic innovation, and how the way we make and access music has changed.

With contributions from leading scholars and cutting-edge researchers, The Routledge Companion to Sounding Art is an essential resource for anyone studying the intersection of sound and art.

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DARE 2015
9 – 11 November 2015
Orpheus Institute | Ghent | Belgium

DARE 2015, The Dark Precursor, is the first international conference entirely dedicated to the relation between artistic research and French philosopher Gilles Deleuze and/or Félix Guattari. The three-day will feature both artistic presentations and scholarly papers that investigate this relation.
The Deleuze/Guattari’s philosophy acts as a key reference for many artist-researchers, who engage with knowledge across academic and non-academic fields of practice. The extent and depth of their influence on artistic research is largely uncharted, nor has their philosophy ever before been evaluated from the perspective of artists.

In collaboration with Studium Generale of Leiden University and several others, I am organizing 6 meetings between Dutch artists and scholars to talk about the role, function, and position of both the arts and the sciences in our contemporary society.

April 14: Ramsey Nasr (poet/writer/actor/director) and Hans Clevers (geneticist/physician/Professor of Immunology)
April 28: Hans van Houwelingen (painter/visual artist) and Maarten Janssen (Professor of Archaeology)
May 12: Barbara Visser (photographer/visual artist) and Frans-Willem Korsten (Professor of Literature and Society)
May 26: Johan Simons (theater director) and Carel Stolker (lawyer and Rector of Leiden University)
June 9: Francine Houben (architect) and Marileen Dogterom (bionanoscientist)
June 23: Colin Benders aka Kyteman (musician) and Bas Haring (philosopher/writer)
Live music by Juan Parra and Henry Vega. Panel chairman Andrea van Pol. Location: Het Paard in The Hague. Official language: Dutch. More info at:

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We all saw the historical landing of Rosetta’s Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko; we saw the pictures. But how does he sound? Here you can listen to him.

The European Space Agency (ESA) was surprised by the comet’s sound, inaudible for human ears as it has a frequency of 40 to 50 milihertz. What you can hear are vibrations from the magnetic field of the comet, here amplified by factor 10,000. The sound is probably caused by neutrons (particles without electric charge) coming from the comet which acquires negative or positive charge in space (a process called ionization).

Sussex

The School of Media, Film and Music (MFM) at the University of Sussex is pleased to invite applications to study for a PhD.

We offer expert supervision in the following areas:

As a member of CHASE, the AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership, MFM is able to offer a number of studentships to well-qualified candidates. CHASE is the Consortium for the Humanities and the Arts in Southeast England, a partnership of 7 institutions (Sussex, UEA, Kent, Goldsmiths, Essex, the Courtauld Institute and the Open University). £17m has been awarded to provide doctoral training and to promote excellence in research, including the funding of 75 scholarships this year.

Successful applicants to MFM will be eligible to compete for these studentships.  For UK students, these awards cover both fees and maintenance and for EU residents awards are on a fees only basis. MFM has an outstanding record in research, and  is currently home to over 90 research students who contribute actively to our lively interdisciplinary research culture. Our students have a good track record in attracting funding.

  • If you would like to visit the campus and talk to faculty, please come to our Postgraduate Open Evening on 3rd December: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/visitus/pg/phdevenings
  • or get in touch with the School’s Director of Doctoral Studies, Dr. Kate Lacey, who is happy to answer any questions about our doctoral programmes and the application process:k.lacey@sussex.ac.uk

The deadline for applications (including all supporting information such as references, etc.) is January 14th 2015. You are encouraged to contact the School as soon as possible to start the application process.

british airways

The airline is pairing its meals with specific tracks, as a study says this can enhance the flavors

British Airways is due to start matching its in-flight meals with specific music tracks in order to counteract the fact that a person’s ability to taste is reduced by 30% while in the air. These pairings are based on a study that suggests some tunes can influence your taste buds, and they aim to help bring out the flavor of the food.

The airline’s new “Sound Bite” menu will be available on the “Rock and Pop” audio channel on long-haul flights from November. This 13-track playlist features music that has been carefully selected to go with each item on the menu, with the intention of enhancing the in-flight meal experience.

A study conducted by Professor Charles Spence and his team at Oxford University in the UK suggests that certain music can influence a person’s taste buds. This has been labelled ‘Sonic Seasoning’, with specific tracks seemingly able to make food seem up to 10% more sweet or salty.

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British Airways’ chef Mark Tazzioli adds that the findings of this study to his list of considerations (which also included taste being altered at altitude) in order to create the new special edition menu. The “Sound Bite” playlist includes Scottish artist Paolo Nutini’s “Scream (Funk My Life Up)” to go with the Scottish salmon starter, Coldplay’s “A Sky Full of Stars” for a classic British main meal, Madonna’s “Ray of Light” for desserts, and “Nessun Dorma” by Placido Domingo to go with a cup of coffee.

The reasoning behind these tracks being selected were that Scottish musicians enhance the providence of Scottish foods, British music should be paired with British food, high tones boost the sweet flavors of puddings, and a tenor’s low tones suit the bitterness of coffee. Professor Spence comments:

In the coming months and years we are going to see far more interest in the matching of music and soundscape to what we eat and drink. I think that it is a really exciting and innovative development to see British Airways taking the first steps in this direction.

bogota

Composer Nic Collins just released his Pea Soup To Go, an open access version of his venerable feedback composition, Pea Soup. Pea Soup To Go is a free streaming audio web application that generates an ever-changing domestic sound art installation on any computer.

Premiered in 1974, Pea Soup creates a self-stabilizing feedback network of microphones and speakers that tunes itself to the architectural acoustics of the space and responds to events—instrumental performances, ambient sounds, human movement, even air currents—with swooping flights of sound. Pea Soup To Go mines decades of performances, including contributions by numerous guest musicians, from around the globe to produce a similarly dreamy soundscape that slowly shifts from key to key as the app shuffles and cross-fades from one recorded space to another.

Pea Soup To Go is being launched on October 24, 2014 — the 40th anniversary of the first performance of Pea Soup.

Point your browser to http://www.nicolascollins.com/peasouptogo/.  Auto-shuffle plays endless variations unattended, or click the arrows to jump to the next track.  Click “Info” for performance details.

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Topic

Up to this moment, there is no satisfying business model for Open Access journals within the Humanities. Yet, there is no turning back especially now the call for Open Access is strongly supported by politicians and funders.
Is it possible to keep existing journals afloat in an Open Access world? Or do we need to make more radical choices by reforming publication culture and journal formats in the Humanities?

This symposium, organised by TS·> Tijdschrift voor tijdschrift­studies and Utrecht University Library, will explore possible solutions for scholarly journals that are contemplating or planning a transition to Open Access, and for journals that are currently trying to survive in Open Access. Experts from the international field of Open Access publishing for Humanities will share their views and experiences.
Furthermore, several journal editors who made the transition to OA will talk about their new business models and the challenges they are facing.

Confirmed speakers and programme

  • Anne Bindslev, PhD (Co-Action Publishing, Senior Publisher)
  • Jan Erik Frantsvåg, MA (University of Tromsø, Open Access Adviser
  • Inge Werner, PhD (Utrecht University Library, Publishing Consultant)
  • Leonie de Goei & Aad Blok (PhD, Royal Netherlands Historical Society, PublisherBMGN – Low Countries Historical Review, & Managing Editor BMGN – Low Countries Historical Review, resp.)
  • Marcel Cobussen, PhD (Leiden University, Founding Editor Journal of Sonic Studies)
  • Esther Op de Beek, PhD (Leiden University, TreasurerTS·> Tijdschrift voor Tijdschriftstudies)

Date and location

  • 17th of October 2014
  • Utrecht University Library, Heidelberglaan 3, 3584 CS Utrecht,
    The Netherlands

Registration

The origin of human music has long been the subject of intense discussion between philosophers, cultural scientists and naturalists. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen, Germany and Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle, US, have now found striking parallels between our music and the song of a small brown bird living in the Amazon region. The Musician Wren favors consonant over dissonant intervals, something that has rarely been observed in other animal species before. This bird’s musicality goes even further: it prefers to sing perfect consonances (octaves, perfect fifths, and perfect fourths) over imperfect consonances leading to some passages which may sound to human listeners as if they are structured around a tonal center.
More info on http://www.mpg.de/7572084/bird-song-human-music

According to the German studio Finally one cannot understand music. One can be seduced by music, or simply enjoy it. But to understand it – that’s impossible. See their animation below.

The main idea reminds me of an interview Pierre Boulez once had on a French television station with a writer whose name I’ve forgotten. First music is a mystery, the writer told Boulez. Then, after studying it, everything becomes clear. But, finally, with the performance, it becomes a mystery again. 

The central question, however, remains: can some knowledge about music enhance the enjoyment or is knowledge sometimes obstructing certain encounters with music? Or do both statements contain some kind of truth?