Archives for category: Science

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Topic

Up to this moment, there is no satisfying business model for Open Access journals within the Humanities. Yet, there is no turning back especially now the call for Open Access is strongly supported by politicians and funders.
Is it possible to keep existing journals afloat in an Open Access world? Or do we need to make more radical choices by reforming publication culture and journal formats in the Humanities?

This symposium, organised by TS·> Tijdschrift voor tijdschrift­studies and Utrecht University Library, will explore possible solutions for scholarly journals that are contemplating or planning a transition to Open Access, and for journals that are currently trying to survive in Open Access. Experts from the international field of Open Access publishing for Humanities will share their views and experiences.
Furthermore, several journal editors who made the transition to OA will talk about their new business models and the challenges they are facing.

Confirmed speakers and programme

  • Anne Bindslev, PhD (Co-Action Publishing, Senior Publisher)
  • Jan Erik Frantsvåg, MA (University of Tromsø, Open Access Adviser
  • Inge Werner, PhD (Utrecht University Library, Publishing Consultant)
  • Leonie de Goei & Aad Blok (PhD, Royal Netherlands Historical Society, PublisherBMGN – Low Countries Historical Review, & Managing Editor BMGN – Low Countries Historical Review, resp.)
  • Marcel Cobussen, PhD (Leiden University, Founding Editor Journal of Sonic Studies)
  • Esther Op de Beek, PhD (Leiden University, TreasurerTS·> Tijdschrift voor Tijdschriftstudies)

Date and location

  • 17th of October 2014
  • Utrecht University Library, Heidelberglaan 3, 3584 CS Utrecht,
    The Netherlands

Registration

The origin of human music has long been the subject of intense discussion between philosophers, cultural scientists and naturalists. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen, Germany and Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle, US, have now found striking parallels between our music and the song of a small brown bird living in the Amazon region. The Musician Wren favors consonant over dissonant intervals, something that has rarely been observed in other animal species before. This bird’s musicality goes even further: it prefers to sing perfect consonances (octaves, perfect fifths, and perfect fourths) over imperfect consonances leading to some passages which may sound to human listeners as if they are structured around a tonal center.
More info on http://www.mpg.de/7572084/bird-song-human-music

According to the German studio Finally one cannot understand music. One can be seduced by music, or simply enjoy it. But to understand it – that’s impossible. See their animation below.

The main idea reminds me of an interview Pierre Boulez once had on a French television station with a writer whose name I’ve forgotten. First music is a mystery, the writer told Boulez. Then, after studying it, everything becomes clear. But, finally, with the performance, it becomes a mystery again.

The central question, however, remains: can some knowledge about music enhance the enjoyment or is knowledge sometimes obstructing certain encounters with music? Or do both statements contain some kind of truth?

On December 7, 2012 I’m organizing a small, 1-day conference on auditory culture in The Netherlands. 20-25 people dealing with sound will gather in a venue in Leiden to discuss sound: philosophers, sound artists, biologists, architects, audiologists, sound designers, psychologists, people from governmental organizations dealing with noise abatement, etc. Aim is to exchange thoughts, to transgress discourses, and to develop a common research strategy. 

Finish researchers from the Aalto University in Helsinki recently recorded the sound of aurora borealis. Point of departure is that light produces sounds. Up until now, the sounds of Northern Lights have always been described as hissing, sighing, or crackling. However, here we can hear ‘clap sounds’, like the snapping of a whip.