vs. Interpretation. Bit of a strange title for a really interesting conference on improvisation I’m currently attending in Prague. Very nice mixture of paper presentations, workshops, and concerts. Today (July 17) great lecture-performance by violinist Mary Oliver, actually a homage to Misha Mengelberg. Also a great concert by George Lewis (electronics, trombone), Pauline Oliveros (accordeon) and Joelle Leandre (double bass). At a certain moment the concert connected to a text I recently wrote for my forthcoming book on improv, complexity, and singularity. The text is about the relation between improv and play and one of the characteristics of play is, at least according to Johan Huizinga in his Home Ludens that it is disconnected from “real” life. However, in this venue where the temperature reached some 35 degrees celcius, Joelle suddenly added her voice to the music, singing the words “It is hot”. In that very moment she broke the disconnection between play and real life – IOW, real life entered the improvisation, if only through text.
Tomorrow a keynote by Pauline and performances by Jef Goldberg, Phil Niblock, and Iva Bittova (among others).

 

 

common linnets

The Common Linnets are a musical duo that represented The Netherlands in this years Eurovision Song Contest in Copenhagen. And they came in second. DJ Schmolli created a mix of their song “Calm After the Storm” with the Police’s monster hit “Every Breath You Take”. Listen here to the original and here to the remix.

 

International Association for the Study of Popular Music, Tilburg University and Erasmus University:
“A long way to the top: The production and reception of music in a globalized world”
6-7 November 2014 – Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands
Deadline: 1 June, 2014
Keynotes: John Street and Fabian Holt

AIM

Once upon a time, a famous rock ‘n’ roll group sang about what it means to play in a music band. In their lyrics they touch upon the role of the music industry (‘getting sold’), the difficulties of a musical career (‘under-paid’ and ‘getting grey’) and music consumption (‘if you wanna be a star’), while celebrating music for music’s sake. As such, this song addresses many issues in the production and reception of popular music in the contemporary globalized world. Yet, recent developments in the field of music have changed the ‘way to the top’, such as governmental policy on music, the rise of new media, and the growing number of music festivals. Focusing on a select number of interrelated themes, this conference aims to bring together scholars from various countries each with their own perspective to engage in an international exchange of ideas and current research insights about music production and reception.

THEMES

Regarding the production of music, we aim for papers on – but not strictly limited to – these themes:

  • Music industries and scenes: for example, what challenges are music industries facing in the 21st century? How have their business models changed over the last decade? To what extent is music increasingly produced within translocal and virtual scenes outside of traditional music industries?
  • Careers in pop music: for example, to what extent have artist labor markets changed over the last decades? Have music careers become longer and more flexible? What factors determine success?
  • Pop music policy: for example, to what extent and why do government organizations (national and local) fund what types of music? How are pop musicians promoted abroad and for what reasons? What role does music play in urban development and city branding?
  • New media and pop music: for example, how have streaming services changed music industries? Did social media affect the marketing of pop music? How do (online) consumer critics affect sales?

Regarding the reception of music, we aim for papers on – but not strictly limited to – these themes:

  • Pop music consumption and identity construction: for example, how important is pop music in processes of bounding and bridging social groups and group identities? How do music fans use the Internet in processes of meaning-making and sacralization?
  • Music performance, festivals and rituals: for example, how can music performances achieve intended transformative effects? How are they clustered in a particular period of time at a particular place? How can we explain the growing popularity of music festivals among international audiences?
  • Pop music, political activism and social movements: for example, what role does pop music play in social change? How politically engaged are pop musicians and what topics do they address?
  • Popular music heritage and tourism: for example, how and which pop music is being canonized? How does this relate to generational conflict, feelings of nostalgia and authenticity? INSTRUCTIONS

Please send your abstract of 400 words in English (including a research question, theory and methodology) together with a short biography (100 words), including name, institutional affiliation and position, phone number, postal and e-mail addresses, to: iaspmconference@eshcc.eur.nl
Abstract deadline: 1 June, 2014. Participants will receive notifications of acceptance by 1 August, 2014.

 

 

image

“Sound Studies: Mapping the Field” will be the title of the second international ESSA conference. It will take place at the University of Copenhagen, June 27-29, 2014. Among the themes are: Case studies that testify to the recent changes within sound studies, theoretical reflections on sound studies’ futures, methodological papers testing the inter- or trans-disciplinary approaches of sound studies, historical papers that may help understand and contextualize the current developments, papers addressing how the sound industries take part in the recent developments, sound design futures, and presentations of contemporary artworks that incorporate sounds.

Proposals for panels: February 1

Individual papers: March 15

Keynote speakers are Georgina Born (Oxford University, UK), Norie Neumark (La Trobe University, Australia), Carolyn Birdsall (Amsterdam University, Holland)

Download the call for papers.

NEWNEWNEW: Call for panel papers

Panel no. 1: Methodologies of Sound Studies

M.Cobussen & H.Schulze

Sounding and hearing are not simple entities to be researched on. The specific corporeal as well as situative character and the historically and culturally relative nature of the sonic demand further developments of existing methods: how can we manage to integrate this rich corpus of everyday and in situ sounds into research? How can we avoid simply objectifying and reifying such processual and situative entities? What heuristics and methods are already in use and prove to result in insightful and inspiring research publications? Are there forgotten or overseen references in the history of epistemologies which we could take up and elaborate for sound studies? Are there research institutes or environments which are maybe overseen by current research and need to be reviewed? How can sound practices – be it in traditional sonification techniques or in daring and advanced forms of sounding art – themselves be used as experiential sites through which (sonic) events are investigated? This panel explores the diversity of approaches, methods and heuristics applicable to research into as well as through sound.

IAB-festival.png

The Improvising Across Borders Conference will take place on July 17-19, 2014, throughout downtown Prague.

Keynote speakers: George Lewis, Pauline Oliveros, and Dana Reason.

I will present a paper on the role of technology in the field of musical improvisation. Central question is if humans are indispensable for improvisation. I will argue that, although human input might always be present in any improvisation, it can be a minor actant in certain occasions; sometimes, technology is the most important (f)actor in an improv event.

You can find more information on the conference  (though not really a lot) on http://agosto-foundation.org/iab/

Afbeelding

The Exposition of Artistic Research: Publishing Art in Academia, edited by Michael Schwab and Henk Borgdorff introduces the pioneering concept of ‘expositions’ in the context of art and design research, where practice needs to be exposed as research to enter academic discourse. It brings together reflective and methodological approaches to exposition writing from a variety of artistic disciplines including fine art, music and design, which it links to questions of publication and the use of technology. The book proposes a novel relationship to knowledge, where the form in which this knowledge emerges and the mode in which it is communicated makes a difference to what is known.

The book contains a chapter written by me entitled “Artistic Sensibility and Aesthetic Sonification”.


To end 2013 here’s some nice guitar music by Macedonian musician Vlatko Stefanovski. I will dedicate some pages to his “interpretations” of the famous Macedonian folktune “Jovana, Jovanke” in my forthcoming (e-)book on improvisation, complexity, and singularity which I’m hoping to finish in 2014. Next to that I will be working on a Routledge sounding art companion which I’m editing with Barry Truax from Vancouver and Vincent Meelberg, my colleague at ACPA and co-editor of The Journal of Sonic Studies

WP-Header-2

The 4th Annual Conference of the Royal Musical Association Music and Philosophy Study Group (in collaboration with the Music and Philosophy Study Group of the American Musicological Society) will be co-hosted by the Departments of Music and Philosophy at King’s College London, 27-28 June 2014.

The call for papers is now open and available here. The deadline for submissions is Friday, 7 February 2014.

Keynote speakers will include:

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE EMS14, 10-14 June 2014, Berlin

The concert work is still considered to be the epitome of electroacoustic music. During a work’s performance the relationships between composition and audience in time and space are defined as homogeneous  – just as in the Aristotelian drama. However, since the 1960s, specific forms of electroacoustic music that challenge the possibility (or conception) of an absolute and exclusive reception have gained substantially in importance. This development resulted in concert forms of extended duration, as well as sound art and music in the media offering the listener opportunities to arrange the perceived sounds in new individual arrangements or to explore the aural space of one piece in various ways.The aesthetical positions and the practical consequences for electroacoustic music that have emerged from these specific environments shall be considered at EMS14 conference.

This EMS conference aims to discuss a number of relevant questions concerning electroacoustic music beyond concert performance among musicologists, composers and sound artists. Musicological studies in this field still lack consistent, rigorous research. Therefore, we explicitly invite papers that focus on aesthetics, history, analysis and practical issues of electroacoustic music of Extended Duration, as Sound Art/Sound Installation, as Media Music, as Conceptual Music, as Participatory Music, in the context of Happenings or extended Concert Forms.

More info on http://www2.ak.tu-berlin.de/Geschichte/Konzerte/2014.06.09-EMS.pdf

The Listening Workshop, launched by Royal Holloway’s Humanities and Arts Research Centre, provides a new central London space for exploring questions of listening from multiple disciplinary perspectives. It has two interlocking strands. One of these is a Reading Group, co-convened by Rachel Beckles Willson and Carlo Cenciarelli, consisting of an open forum for discussing new and canonic texts on the history, ethnography and theory of listening. The other strand is a series of talks by speakers from a variety of disciplines (English Literature, Ethnomusicology, Geography, History, Media Arts, Musicology, Sociology). Subjects range from ‘sonic horror’ in fiction to sound design to urban soundscapes and beyond.

More info on http://www.rhul.ac.uk/harc/home.aspx

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 453 other followers