cage

Friday, November 21, 2014

Galerie Maio Mazzoli, Berlin, Germany

No tolerance for silence?

Charles Morrow Production and the Faithful! Festival invite you to submit your stereo recordings of John Cage’s flagship composition 4’33” to the David Tudor Memorial 4’33” Competition. Any score edition, instrumentation, or recording location is welcome.

Twelve finalists will featured in MorrowSound installations at Galerie Mario Mazzoli in Berlin and at the Ear Up! Gallery in New York in November 2014. MorrowSound is a state-of-the-art immersive sound environment whose unique approach to vertical movement will transport listeners to the environments in which the performances were recorded.

The Grand Prize winner will receive a one-time cash award of 4,33€ and be announced at the Galerie Mario Mazzoli opening on 16 November.

To submit, please send the following items to fourthirtythree@morrowsound.com

• First and last name
• Postal address, phone number, and email address
• Time, date, and location of the recording
• Name of the recordist, if different from the applicant
• A stereo .wav or .aiff file (preferably 48kHz, 24-bit) OR a download link via wetransfer, soundcloud, or private website
• Please do NOT send mp3s or Dropbox invitations

Deadline for submission: 7 November 2014.

For more information please visit

Charles Morrow Productions
http://www.cmorrow.com/
http://vimeo.com/50825294

John Cage Trust
http://www.johncage.org/about.html

mcm2015-banner-5

The Fifth Biennial International Conference on Mathematics and Computation in Music(MCM2015) will be held on 22-25 June-2015  at Queen Mary University of London in the United Kingdom. MCM is the flagship conference of the Society for Mathematics and Computation in Music, whose official publication is the Journal of Mathematics and Music.

The aim of the conference is to bring together researchers from around the world who adopt mathematical and/or computational approaches to address any aspect of music theory, music analysis, composition and performance. MCM aims to provide a dedicated platform for the communication and exchange of ideas amongst researchers in mathematics, informatics, music theory, composition, musicology, and related disciplines.

We welcome submissions on any topic relating to mathematics and/or computation and music, including (but not limited to):

  • Mathematical and computational models of and/or approaches to
    • musicology, music theory and analysis, composition
    • musical performance and improvisation
    • the perception and cognition of any aspect of musical structure
    • music and emotion
    • musical learning and education
    • musical interaction and gestures
  • Logical, philosophical and methodological aspects of mathematics and computation in music
  • The history of mathematics and computation in music
  • Applications of mathematical music theory and computational tools for musicians, musicologists and others who work with music

We invite submissions of the following types:

  • Long papers (10-12 pages in the Springer LNCS style) to be presented orally
  • Short papers (4-6 pages in the Springer LNCS style) to be presented as posters
  • Panel discussions
  • Workshops and tutorials

Accepted papers will be published by Springer in an edited volume in the series Lecture Notes in Computer Science, as were the proceedings of previous MCM conferences. For further details on the submissions guidelines for each of these types please checkout the “Submission” site.

The deadline for all types of submission is : Friday 9 January 2015.

Palesdtra NuSon 1

End of September, beginning of October I will be doing several “things” in Brazil, first at the Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG) and then at the Universidade de São Paulo (USP). At the UFG I will give a keynote lecture on Artistic Research, conduct a 3-day course on improvisation, and participate in a round table discussion on the role, position, and function of music in contemporary society. At the USP I will chair a seminar on improvisation, complexity and singularity and a seminar on methodologies of Artistic Research. Besides I will join the Orquestra Errante both as a pianist and as a conductor.

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Topic

Up to this moment, there is no satisfying business model for Open Access journals within the Humanities. Yet, there is no turning back especially now the call for Open Access is strongly supported by politicians and funders.
Is it possible to keep existing journals afloat in an Open Access world? Or do we need to make more radical choices by reforming publication culture and journal formats in the Humanities?

This symposium, organised by TS·> Tijdschrift voor tijdschrift­studies and Utrecht University Library, will explore possible solutions for scholarly journals that are contemplating or planning a transition to Open Access, and for journals that are currently trying to survive in Open Access. Experts from the international field of Open Access publishing for Humanities will share their views and experiences.
Furthermore, several journal editors who made the transition to OA will talk about their new business models and the challenges they are facing.

Confirmed speakers and programme

  • Anne Bindslev, PhD (Co-Action Publishing, Senior Publisher)
  • Jan Erik Frantsvåg, MA (University of Tromsø, Open Access Adviser
  • Inge Werner, PhD (Utrecht University Library, Publishing Consultant)
  • Leonie de Goei & Aad Blok (PhD, Royal Netherlands Historical Society, PublisherBMGN – Low Countries Historical Review, & Managing Editor BMGN – Low Countries Historical Review, resp.)
  • Marcel Cobussen, PhD (Leiden University, Founding Editor Journal of Sonic Studies)
  • Esther Op de Beek, PhD (Leiden University, TreasurerTS·> Tijdschrift voor Tijdschriftstudies)

Date and location

  • 17th of October 2014
  • Utrecht University Library, Heidelberglaan 3, 3584 CS Utrecht,
    The Netherlands

Registration

vs. Interpretation. Bit of a strange title for a really interesting conference on improvisation I’m currently attending in Prague. Very nice mixture of paper presentations, workshops, and concerts. Today (July 17) great lecture-performance by violinist Mary Oliver, actually a homage to Misha Mengelberg. Also a great concert by George Lewis (electronics, trombone), Pauline Oliveros (accordeon) and Joelle Leandre (double bass). At a certain moment the concert connected to a text I recently wrote for my forthcoming book on improv, complexity, and singularity. The text is about the relation between improv and play and one of the characteristics of play is, at least according to Johan Huizinga in his Home Ludens that it is disconnected from “real” life. However, in this venue where the temperature reached some 35 degrees celcius, Joelle suddenly added her voice to the music, singing the words “It is hot”. In that very moment she broke the disconnection between play and real life – IOW, real life entered the improvisation, if only through text.
Tomorrow a keynote by Pauline and performances by Jef Goldberg, Phil Niblock, and Iva Bittova (among others).

 

 

common linnets

The Common Linnets are a musical duo that represented The Netherlands in this years Eurovision Song Contest in Copenhagen. And they came in second. DJ Schmolli created a mix of their song “Calm After the Storm” with the Police’s monster hit “Every Breath You Take”. Listen here to the original and here to the remix.

 

International Association for the Study of Popular Music, Tilburg University and Erasmus University:
“A long way to the top: The production and reception of music in a globalized world”
6-7 November 2014 – Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands
Deadline: 1 June, 2014
Keynotes: John Street and Fabian Holt

AIM

Once upon a time, a famous rock ‘n’ roll group sang about what it means to play in a music band. In their lyrics they touch upon the role of the music industry (‘getting sold’), the difficulties of a musical career (‘under-paid’ and ‘getting grey’) and music consumption (‘if you wanna be a star’), while celebrating music for music’s sake. As such, this song addresses many issues in the production and reception of popular music in the contemporary globalized world. Yet, recent developments in the field of music have changed the ‘way to the top’, such as governmental policy on music, the rise of new media, and the growing number of music festivals. Focusing on a select number of interrelated themes, this conference aims to bring together scholars from various countries each with their own perspective to engage in an international exchange of ideas and current research insights about music production and reception.

THEMES

Regarding the production of music, we aim for papers on – but not strictly limited to – these themes:

  • Music industries and scenes: for example, what challenges are music industries facing in the 21st century? How have their business models changed over the last decade? To what extent is music increasingly produced within translocal and virtual scenes outside of traditional music industries?
  • Careers in pop music: for example, to what extent have artist labor markets changed over the last decades? Have music careers become longer and more flexible? What factors determine success?
  • Pop music policy: for example, to what extent and why do government organizations (national and local) fund what types of music? How are pop musicians promoted abroad and for what reasons? What role does music play in urban development and city branding?
  • New media and pop music: for example, how have streaming services changed music industries? Did social media affect the marketing of pop music? How do (online) consumer critics affect sales?

Regarding the reception of music, we aim for papers on – but not strictly limited to – these themes:

  • Pop music consumption and identity construction: for example, how important is pop music in processes of bounding and bridging social groups and group identities? How do music fans use the Internet in processes of meaning-making and sacralization?
  • Music performance, festivals and rituals: for example, how can music performances achieve intended transformative effects? How are they clustered in a particular period of time at a particular place? How can we explain the growing popularity of music festivals among international audiences?
  • Pop music, political activism and social movements: for example, what role does pop music play in social change? How politically engaged are pop musicians and what topics do they address?
  • Popular music heritage and tourism: for example, how and which pop music is being canonized? How does this relate to generational conflict, feelings of nostalgia and authenticity? INSTRUCTIONS

Please send your abstract of 400 words in English (including a research question, theory and methodology) together with a short biography (100 words), including name, institutional affiliation and position, phone number, postal and e-mail addresses, to: iaspmconference@eshcc.eur.nl
Abstract deadline: 1 June, 2014. Participants will receive notifications of acceptance by 1 August, 2014.

 

 

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“Sound Studies: Mapping the Field” will be the title of the second international ESSA conference. It will take place at the University of Copenhagen, June 27-29, 2014. Among the themes are: Case studies that testify to the recent changes within sound studies, theoretical reflections on sound studies’ futures, methodological papers testing the inter- or trans-disciplinary approaches of sound studies, historical papers that may help understand and contextualize the current developments, papers addressing how the sound industries take part in the recent developments, sound design futures, and presentations of contemporary artworks that incorporate sounds.

Proposals for panels: February 1

Individual papers: March 15

Keynote speakers are Georgina Born (Oxford University, UK), Norie Neumark (La Trobe University, Australia), Carolyn Birdsall (Amsterdam University, Holland)

Download the call for papers.

NEWNEWNEW: Call for panel papers

Panel no. 1: Methodologies of Sound Studies

M.Cobussen & H.Schulze

Sounding and hearing are not simple entities to be researched on. The specific corporeal as well as situative character and the historically and culturally relative nature of the sonic demand further developments of existing methods: how can we manage to integrate this rich corpus of everyday and in situ sounds into research? How can we avoid simply objectifying and reifying such processual and situative entities? What heuristics and methods are already in use and prove to result in insightful and inspiring research publications? Are there forgotten or overseen references in the history of epistemologies which we could take up and elaborate for sound studies? Are there research institutes or environments which are maybe overseen by current research and need to be reviewed? How can sound practices – be it in traditional sonification techniques or in daring and advanced forms of sounding art – themselves be used as experiential sites through which (sonic) events are investigated? This panel explores the diversity of approaches, methods and heuristics applicable to research into as well as through sound.

IAB-festival.png

The Improvising Across Borders Conference will take place on July 17-19, 2014, throughout downtown Prague.

Keynote speakers: George Lewis, Pauline Oliveros, and Dana Reason.

I will present a paper on the role of technology in the field of musical improvisation. Central question is if humans are indispensable for improvisation. I will argue that, although human input might always be present in any improvisation, it can be a minor actant in certain occasions; sometimes, technology is the most important (f)actor in an improv event.

You can find more information on the conference  (though not really a lot) on http://agosto-foundation.org/iab/

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