deleuze

The Dark Precursor

Orpheus Institute, Ghent, Belgium, 9 – 11 November 2015

Submissions are now open to DARE 2015, the first international conference explicitly addressing possibilities, uses and appropriations of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s philosophies in the field of Artistic Research.

The conference is hosted by the Orpheus Institute, the European leading center for artistic research in music, and the MusicExperiment21 research program, funded by the European Research Council.

Confirmed presentations are by Éric Alliez, Ian Buchanan, Marcel Cobussen, Erin Manning, Taina Riikonen, Anne Sauvagnargues, Peter Stamer and Mick Wilson.

Submissions are welcome from all scholars of Deleuze and/or Guattari with a specific interest in artistic research, as well as from all artist and artist researchers specifically interested in Deleuze and Guattari’s philosophy. This year’s theme is Deleuze’s concept of dark precursor and suggested areas of presentations include, but are not limited to:

  • Film, music, painting, writing, etc. (Practices of creating and researching)
  • Abstract machine, assemblage, diagram, dark precursor, etc. (Ontology)
  • Dramatization, experimentation, rhizomatics, schizoanalysis, etc. (Epistemology and Methodology)
  • Imaginary, figure, rhythm, sensation, etc. (Aesthetics)
  • Code, form, sign, utterance, etc. (Logic)
  • Becoming-x, habit, life, nomadism, etc. (Ethics and Politics)

Artists, artist researchers, and scholars are encouraged to experiment with all modes presentation (performative, participatory, collaborative, interactive, etc.) and within or across all art forms (performing, visual, aural, tactile, new media, design, literary, etc.). Please submit your outline of presentation in English or French using the DARE 2015 abstract submission system: http://dare2015.exordo.com/

The closing date for submission is Monday, 1 June 2015.

Conference website: darkprecursor.org

Conference coordinator: Paolo Giudici conference@darkprecursor.com

orgelpark

Bending Baroque: Organs as Artistic, Musical, and Sonic Technologies

The Orgelpark, Amsterdam, June 4-6 2015

Amongst musical instruments, the pipe organ has the longest history of innovation. Since the ancient Greeks the design and function of the pipe organ has routinely changed, leading many to examine how these instruments both influence and are influenced by changing musical cultures. Added to this, organs are also technical artifacts and contain within them centuries of building practices and the tacit knowledge of organ builders. As such, organs can be interpreted as aesthetic and technological mirrors of their time.

The aim of this symposium is to situate organs as objects that are simultaneously musical and technical, producing music/sound as well as knowledge. As such, they combine artistic and epistemic practices in relation to performance, listening, and design. To better explore these topics, we invite contributions that draw upon Science & Technology Studies (including the Philosophy and History of Science), Sound Studies, and Artistic Research.

The context of this symposium is the building of a ‘New Baroque Organ’ at the Orgelpark, a privately funded concert venue in Amsterdam that aims to integrate the organ into contemporary musical cultures by presenting it in new ways. The New Baroque Organ will combine 18th and 21st century technologies. Its purpose is to facilitate historically informed performances of Johann Sebastian Bach’s organ music and to make the sound resources needed for that accessible in innovative ways that can inspire new music. As such, the New Baroque Organ represents a next step in the development of radically innovative organs that the American organist and organ scholar Randall Harlow has called ‘hyper organs’.

The process of designing this organ has opened up a number of questions that we wish to explore during this symposium, including:

  • How can insights and themes from studies of technological innovation be applied to the construction of the New Baroque Organ?
  • What connections are there between musical instruments and the creation of new knowledge about these instruments and musical culture? Can we consider musical instruments as we do scientific instruments that produce particular epistemic practices.
  • How are, and how can, historically informed practices of performance, composition, and listening taken into account in the design of the organ?
  • How can we think of the organ as an artistic technology?

We invite papers and art works that examine these questions and others like them.

Please, submit your abstract of no more than 300 words no later than 1 April 2015 to hansfidom@orgelpark.nl or p.peters@maastrichtuniversity.nl

glasgow

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 31 MARCH 2015

The Ninth Biennial International Conference on Music Since 1900 will take place at the University of Glasgow, School of Culture and Creative Arts, from Monday 7th September to Wednesday 9th September, 2015. We invite proposals for papers on any topic relating to 20th- and 21st-century music conceived in the broadest possible terms, including sound studies and inter-media arts. We welcome all methodological approaches, and particularly encourage submissions that question disciplinary boundaries and/or propose interdisciplinary perspectives.

Proposals in the following categories will be considered:

  • Papers: 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion. Please submit a 250-word (maximum) abstract.
  • Paper sessions: 3 or 4 papers, each of 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion. Please submit a 250-word (maximum) summary of the session, plus a 250-word (maximum) abstract for each session participant.
  • Lecture-recitals, including lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings. Please submit a 250-word (maximum) summary, plus participant CVs and recordings/scores/other details of works to be included in the event.

Proposals (as a Word attachment) can be sent to arts-icmsn@glasgow.ac.uk, indicating whether you need any AV equipment or a piano. Successful applicants will be informed by 1 May 2015.

Program committee: Dr Eva Moreda Rodriguez (University of Glasgow, Chair), Dr David Code (University of Glasgow), Dr Laura Hamer (Liverpool Hope University), Dr Philippa Lovatt (University of Stirling), Dr Christopher Mark (University of Surrey), Dr Mark Percival (Queen Margaret University)

whisper opera

The setting:  Four stages separated by semi-translucent lace curtains. Each stage contains one instrument besides a hanging big drum and a cymbal. The audience (max. 48) is divided in 8 x 6 people and seated in between the four stages so that each group of people can only see one stage.

The beginning: four musicians on the four different stages start playing the cymbals by, for example, turning them around and around; the sound is barely audible. After a while, they start whispering short textual fragments in a polyphonic style.

The middle: a beautiful musical conversation between flute and clarinet. It is almost impossible to distinguish which sound is coming from which instrument. They interact as a kind of echoing.

The end: the loudest part of the piece, though still really soft – an affecting aria (the first and only time the female vocalist really sings), accompanied by cello, clarinet, flute, and keyboard. The ending is quite abrupt.

David Lang’s Whispering Opera. Fantastic!

WP-Header-21
We’re delighted to announce that our 2015 Annual Conference will take place at King’s College London on 17-18 July 2015. The event will be co-hosted by the Departments of Music and Philosophy at King’s College London and the Institute of Musical Research, University of London. As part of our first ever tri-continental partnership, the event is being held in collaboration with the Music and Philosophy Study Group of the American Musicological Society and De Musica – Laboratório de Estética e Filosofia da Música (Brasil).
The optional theme for the event is “Music and the Senses.” The call for papers is now open!
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/call-for-papers/
The deadline for proposals is 7 March 2015. Outcomes will be communicated to all authors by 21 March 2015 in order to allow plentiful time to make travel arrangements for those coming from further afield who may only be able to attend the event if a paper is accepted.
Keynote speakers will include:
  • Professor Christopher Peacocke (Columbia University)
  • Professor Kay Kaufman Shelemay (Harvard University)
There will also be a plenary panel discussion on the theme of “Absolute Music,” featuring panelists:
  • Professor Mark Evan Bonds (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
  • Professor Simon Frith (University of Edinburgh)
  • Professor Hannah Ginsborg (University of California at Berkeley)
Further information on these speakers is available here:
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/keynote-plenary-speakers/ 
For more information on all aspects of the conference, please visit the conference website:
http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2015/ 

car sounds

Perhaps not with the most well-known artists, but certainly one of the nicest sound art festivals in The Netherlands, at a beautiful spot and in an interesting building: the PNEM Sound Art Festival in Uden.

soundwalks

Special references: great improv performance by the French cello player, Soizic Lebrat; the presence of the grand old man of Dutch sound art, Willem de Ridder, and the accessible “In-formed Music” by Alan Courtis for 15 players and piles of newspapers.

in-formed music 2 alan courtis (arg)soizic lebrat (f)

philae-568x319

We all saw the historical landing of Rosetta’s Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko; we saw the pictures. But how does he sound? Here you can listen to him.

The European Space Agency (ESA) was surprised by the comet’s sound, inaudible for human ears as it has a frequency of 40 to 50 milihertz. What you can hear are vibrations from the magnetic field of the comet, here amplified by factor 10,000. The sound is probably caused by neutrons (particles without electric charge) coming from the comet which acquires negative or positive charge in space (a process called ionization).

2014-09-30 09.56.19

In October 2014 I gave a lecture at the University of Sao Paolo (Brazil) about research in and through the arts, with an emphasis on its methodological aspects. Here you can find an integral registration of this talk.

Sussex

The School of Media, Film and Music (MFM) at the University of Sussex is pleased to invite applications to study for a PhD.

We offer expert supervision in the following areas:

As a member of CHASE, the AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership, MFM is able to offer a number of studentships to well-qualified candidates. CHASE is the Consortium for the Humanities and the Arts in Southeast England, a partnership of 7 institutions (Sussex, UEA, Kent, Goldsmiths, Essex, the Courtauld Institute and the Open University). £17m has been awarded to provide doctoral training and to promote excellence in research, including the funding of 75 scholarships this year.

Successful applicants to MFM will be eligible to compete for these studentships.  For UK students, these awards cover both fees and maintenance and for EU residents awards are on a fees only basis. MFM has an outstanding record in research, and  is currently home to over 90 research students who contribute actively to our lively interdisciplinary research culture. Our students have a good track record in attracting funding.

  • If you would like to visit the campus and talk to faculty, please come to our Postgraduate Open Evening on 3rd December: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/visitus/pg/phdevenings
  • or get in touch with the School’s Director of Doctoral Studies, Dr. Kate Lacey, who is happy to answer any questions about our doctoral programmes and the application process:k.lacey@sussex.ac.uk

The deadline for applications (including all supporting information such as references, etc.) is January 14th 2015. You are encouraged to contact the School as soon as possible to start the application process.

british airways

The airline is pairing its meals with specific tracks, as a study says this can enhance the flavors

British Airways is due to start matching its in-flight meals with specific music tracks in order to counteract the fact that a person’s ability to taste is reduced by 30% while in the air. These pairings are based on a study that suggests some tunes can influence your taste buds, and they aim to help bring out the flavor of the food.

The airline’s new “Sound Bite” menu will be available on the “Rock and Pop” audio channel on long-haul flights from November. This 13-track playlist features music that has been carefully selected to go with each item on the menu, with the intention of enhancing the in-flight meal experience.

A study conducted by Professor Charles Spence and his team at Oxford University in the UK suggests that certain music can influence a person’s taste buds. This has been labelled ‘Sonic Seasoning’, with specific tracks seemingly able to make food seem up to 10% more sweet or salty.

ba-in-flight-meal.jpg

British Airways’ chef Mark Tazzioli adds that the findings of this study to his list of considerations (which also included taste being altered at altitude) in order to create the new special edition menu. The “Sound Bite” playlist includes Scottish artist Paolo Nutini’s “Scream (Funk My Life Up)” to go with the Scottish salmon starter, Coldplay’s “A Sky Full of Stars” for a classic British main meal, Madonna’s “Ray of Light” for desserts, and “Nessun Dorma” by Placido Domingo to go with a cup of coffee.

The reasoning behind these tracks being selected were that Scottish musicians enhance the providence of Scottish foods, British music should be paired with British food, high tones boost the sweet flavors of puddings, and a tenor’s low tones suit the bitterness of coffee. Professor Spence comments:

In the coming months and years we are going to see far more interest in the matching of music and soundscape to what we eat and drink. I think that it is a really exciting and innovative development to see British Airways taking the first steps in this direction.

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